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 Anyone for Chronicles of Ramlar? 
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Joined: Thu Dec 17, 2009 4:35 am
Posts: 311
Location: Glendale, AZ, USA
Post Anyone for Chronicles of Ramlar?
Hey folks, I've been wanting to run or play in a Chronicles of Ramlar campaign for at least a year or two now, but have never been able to find a group for it. I'm wondering if there's enough interest here for an OpenRPG campaign of Ramlar?

At this point, I don't even mind if you don't have the rulebook for it. I can handle the rules-minutia when needed, after explaining the basic mechanics for the players. And I can explain whatever details are needed for a PC's particular abilities and gear. I just wanna try the game out with a group of 3-6 players (I suppose I could try it with 2 players and one helper-NPC, though).

I'd prefer to run a game on Thursdays or Saturdays (ending before 7pm Pacific if playing on Saturdays, as I'm involved in a Saturday-night game), but I could possibly run something on Mondays, Tuesdays, or Fridays.

For anyone who doesn't have the book, Chronicles of Ramlar is a fantasy RPG heavily based on D&D and The Lord of the Rings in some rather obvious ways (the setting's creation myth and pantheon is blatantly inspired by Tolkien's "Ainulindale" in The Silmarillion, while the races and monsters of the setting are obviously based on those in LotR and D&D). The game, however, is much more roleplay-focused and character-driven than D&D (at least by the rules-as-written).

Character advancement is purely a result of actions taken in the game and how much or how helpfully you participate in each game session; Ramlar has no experience points for combat or the like. Instead, Chronicles of Ramlar gives each PC 1 'dot' towards their Participation Circle after each session that the player attends and participates in, plus an extra 'dot' if the player did some constructive roleplaying or otherwise helped move the story along etc., and an extra 'dot' if the PC did something especially heroic or incredible or significant. Characters level up each time that they acquire enough 'dots' to complete a Participation Circle. Levelling up increases your Life Points so your character can survive better, grants you more skill points to spend, and grants you new Talents.

Characters also get 4 other Demeanor/Theme Circles for character advancement; each can be assigned to a particular goal or stat, and those D/T Circles can be reassigned later (even if incomplete), but reassigning a D/T Circle causes you to lose whatever 'dots' of progress you had made in it since the last time you completed the Circle. These D/T Circles are used to improve specific stats or achieve particular goals, instead of increasing your level. Whenever you complete one of these 4 D/T Circles, the assigned stat goes up or you gain some extra skill points to spend on a set of related skills, or you complete whatever goal you had set it to. Each significant amount of practice, training, or study with a particular stat will earn you a 'dot' towards that stat's D/T Circle if you have it assigned to one; broadly-themed D/T Circles will advance more slowly than narrowly-focused ones (trying to raise your Weaponsmithing Expertise, for example, is easier than trying to raise your Strength or all INT-based skills).

You can assign a D/T Circle to your character's patron deity in order to earn Divine Boons from that deity over time, if you character performs enough actions that support the deity's portfolio (i.e. fighting a lot of battles will earn you favor with the god of war, for example, if you devote a D/T Circle to that deity). You can also replace some or all of your 1st-level Talents with Divine Boons at character creation, but only at char-gen (later Boons must be earned through play, and you cannot devote D/T Circles to Talents).

The playable races of the game are 4 different subraces of humans (one fairly civilized human race, one race of human barbarians in the frigid north, one race of secretive humans in the desert, and one race of sinister humans that favor necromancy and blood magic), 4 different subraces of elves (nature-loving forest-elves, primitive plains-elves, master-crafting mountain-elves, and the tainted dark elves), 2 subraces of dwarves (one tough race of dwarves and one scholarly race of dwarves), and one race of halflings, as well as the setting's one semi-unique race, the Spirinari, who are basically like humans or elves but with a divine gift that allows them to speak with spirits and forge a unique magical substance.

Each race has particular attribute modifiers but no other rules-differences except the Spirinari and the plains-elves (Tylvare); Tylvare alone are incapable of Magic. However, there are some places and items that are specific to particular races (for instance, only dwarves are admitted into Runespar University, the premiere academy for magic item enchantment, while only Tylvare elves may tame and ride a sarthin, which is a giant lizard resembling a velociraptor).

Characters advance in various Paths, ranging from the 5 basic Paths available to anyone (though Tylvare cannot take magic-wielding Paths), to the 15 elite Paths that have simple requirements (like gaining certain weapon talents before becoming a Weapon Adept), and the 15 master Paths with major prerequisites. Elite and master Paths generally require devoting a D/T Circle to them beforehand, such that you need to complete various tasks for that D/T Circle before your character can gain sufficient training to gain a level in that Path. Paths have little direct impact on your character, but allow you to select Talents specific to those Paths whenever you gain a level in the appropriate Path.

The 5 basic paths are Merthwarg (basically covering druids, rangers, and barbarians in D&D terms), Rogue (obvious), Sevar (basically clerics and paladins or blackguards in D&D terms), Warrior (obvious), and Wizard (arcane spellcasters who can bind familiars). Each Path also determines which skills you gain points to spend on when levelling up in that Path, and each Path has some particular advantage of its own.

The game mechanics use percentile-dice rolls (1d100 or 2d10), with skills and attributes having values between 0 and 100 (or higher after racial modifiers), though smaller dice are used for damage/healing (like d12s for some weapons or d6s for some spells). Characters and monsters have various hit locations on their body, each with separate Life Points (and armor points if wearing armor in those locations), so each limb or the like can be disabled in combat, while some healing effects apply to all hit locations and others just apply to a single hit location per use. The hit location for each attack is determined randomly unless the attacker makes a called shot at a penatly to-hit.

You can wear different armors in different hit locations, and each type of armor has some advantages and disadvantages, though some are clearly better (though often more expensive). Shields provide extra defense and can soak up some damage, protecting certain hit locations based on their size. Heavier armors and shields interfere more with spellcasting and roguish activities, which can be reduced somewhat by Talents. You can customize your weapons, armors, shields, and spells during play through various options, while your choice of Paths, skills, and Talents allow further customization. You can take levels in different Paths over time.

That's about all the detail I feel like going into right now, and I don't intend to give away too much of the setting or game mechanics anyway. But if there's enough interest here for a campaign, I can give some more character-specific details for anyone that wants to play.

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Active DM and player on OpenRPG since 2002
D&D, d20, PF, SR, and other systems if I can find a group for 'em


Wed Nov 16, 2011 12:33 pm
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Joined: Fri Apr 15, 2011 11:32 pm
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Post Re: Anyone for Chronicles of Ramlar?
It sounds kind of interesting. I'd want to be able to read the rules at some point before creating a character though.


Wed Nov 16, 2011 5:14 pm
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Joined: Sat Jan 08, 2011 12:18 pm
Posts: 89
Post Re: Anyone for Chronicles of Ramlar?
Depending on the eventual day and time, I'd be up for this. I've always been a bit bigger on the RP aspects, and I'd love to give a spellcaster a shot :)


Thu Nov 17, 2011 12:31 am
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Joined: Fri Dec 18, 2009 6:30 pm
Posts: 127
Post Re: Anyone for Chronicles of Ramlar?
I'll play.


Thu Nov 17, 2011 8:56 pm
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Joined: Thu Dec 17, 2009 4:35 am
Posts: 311
Location: Glendale, AZ, USA
Post Re: Anyone for Chronicles of Ramlar?
Cool. :)

I intend to run a character-driven campaign with Chronicles of Ramlar, so your character backgrounds and goals/motivations will be the determining factor in what kind of adventures I'll run for them. I have some ideas, and will probably start the group off with an initial bringing-everyone-together adventure if they're not already linked by common background elements (i.e. relatives, neighbors, fellow soldiers, a shared mentor, or whatever). Note that PCs in Ramlar receive a Participation dot at the start of the game if their players provide a good or decent background description.

D/T Circle dots, except Participation dots, can be 'spent' for temporary bonuses on actions related to those Demeanors/Themes, and you can 'spend' multiple dots for a higher bonus, but each dot can only be spent once per adventure. Spent dots are not lost, so they still count towards advancing that D/T. Though it's only a +1% bonus per dot spent on the roll, it can occasionally help, and you're allowed to spend a D/T dot after rolling so long as it's before the GM tells you the end result.

The game uses a roll-under resolution mechanic; to succeed at any given roll, your roll's result must be equal to or lower than the relevant attribute, skill, or the percentage chance of success for the task. Talents, spells, and items can grant bonuses or penalties to your rolls, which are always applied as a bonus or penalty to the % success chance (so if you have 50 Charisma and have something granting +10% to Charisma rolls, your total chance of success with a Charisma roll is 60%). GMs can apply situational modifiers to the success chance based on how difficult a task is, as appropriate, with some guidelines in the book.

You get a sensational success or critical hit if your roll is successful and evenly divisible by 10 (10, 20, 30, etc.), or instead a botch or critical fumble if your roll failed with a result evenly divisible by 10. These have extra advantages or negative consequences as appropriate; botching a Climbing roll results in a fall, while a critical hit on an attack deals double damage (critical hits also double the roll's Success Value). Any successful roll has a Success Value (SV) of 1/10th its result, rounded down. SV determines your degree of success; high SV on an attribute or skill roll means you get more out of that attribute/skill use or complete the task faster or handle it better, like negotiating for a better deal or completing your armor repairs sooner.

Similarly, a botch or critical fumble has more severe drawbacks if it's equivalent SV is high; rolling an 80 with an attack when your success chance is 43% might result in dropping your weapon instead of just missing, whereas rolling a 60 on an Armoury roll with a 54% success chance might just result in a minor slip-up that deals a tiny bit of damage to the armor instead of repairing it.

You can risk a higher chance of failure in exchange for higher potential SV with a roll, choosing beforehand to lower your effective % success chance; every 5% penalty you choose to take in that fashion earns you +1 automatic SV if you succeed. There are some minor rules for possible success or failure even when your percentage chance of success is 0 or lower, or 100%+, but they're not important except in rare circumstances.

SV from attack rolls in combat provide Momentum you can use for combat benefits in the following round. Momentum is spent to make extra attacks, increase hit chances for yourself and allies, increase your Defense Rating and sometimes that of allies, grant yourself and possibly allies a damage bonus on their next succesful hit, gain Damage Resistance for yourself and possibly allies to reduce damage from all attacks, gain bonuses on Resistance rolls for yourself and allies against enemy spells/talents/abilities, reroll a percentage roll (except botches and fumbles), turn one of your attacks into an automatic Sneak Attack, turn one of your attacks into a Stunning Attack, grant yourself and allies an Initiative bonus, or neutralize a weapon or object in some cases. Momentum is only gained if you give a suitable roleplaying description for your action, and it can only be spent with an appropriate RP description of what you're doing with that spent Momentum.

Besides spending Momentum, other combat options include called shots, disarming, dual-weapon fighting, keeping enemies at bay, parrying attacks, sapping opponents to knock them unconscious, shield bashing, sneak attacks with surprise or a distraction (or spending Momentum), and neutralizing regular weapons/items with appropriate called shots (magic items or plot-devices typically require spending Momentum to neutralize with an attack). Movement is generally abstracted, but when specific movement determination is needed, you can move up to your Nimbleness attribute in feet while performing another action in the same round, or further with a Nimbleness roll to push yourself in a sprint.

Characters and monsters all have an Attack Rating based on certain attributes, and a Defense Rating based on a different set of attributes. AR and DR range from 1 to 20, and can be improved by certain Talents but no higher than 20. Your success rate with attacks is based on a comparison of your AR to the target's DR, yielding a percentage chance of success for your Attack rolls. Talents and items can modify that percentage.

Similarly, Rogues gain a Subterfuge Rating for roguish tasks, based on certain attributes, and they compare it to the Difficulty Number for whatever roguish task they're attempting (like picking a lock, smuggling some goods, or disarming a trap), to get a percentage chance of success for Subterfuge rolls. Spellcasters gain a Contact Rating to access the magical leylines, likewise based on certain attributes, which is compared to the spell's Difficulty to get their percentage chance of success for Contact rolls to cast the spell. Spells can have different aspects improvised for increased or altered effects (like longer range, higher damage, a wider area of effect, longer duration, more targets, etc., or even reductions in the spell's parameters), yielding a bonus or penalty to the success chance.

Worn and carried gear has an Encumbrance Value (EV) representing how heavy it is and how bulky/unwieldy it is to carry. Armor and shield EV penalizes Contact/Subterfuge success chances, but Talents can reduce or negate that penalty. Warriors can reduce their armor/shield EV with the Armor Proficiency Talent. Carrying a total EV higher than your Strength will penalize your Nimbleness and certain rolls, and there are limits to how much total EV you can haul. Pack mules or the like are a necessity for any adventurers that intend to haul more than a small amount of treasure or a small amount of gear and supplies without penalty. Characters start out with two free outfits, two free weapons (one simple weapon and one other weapon they must be proficient in), and 50 gold pieces at 1st-level.

Armor worn provides a bonus or penalty to Defense Rating (most armor gives a penalty, but some light armors yield a bonus), while shields grant a bonus to Defense Rating. Armor provides Armor Points (AP) to each hit location it covers, while shields have their own AP that can soak up damage from an attack against any hit location the shield protects. Once armor or a shield is reduced to 0 AP, any further damage to that location reduces your LP. Heavier armors/shields provide more AP. Larger/heavier shields also grant more DR and protect more hit locations with their AP. Simple weapons tend to deal less damage than martial weapons, while special weapons tend to deal the most damage. Anyone can use simple weapons, but Talents are needed for martial or special weapons (otherwise you take a big penalty to-hit). Warriors gain the Martial Weapon Familiarity Talent for free, which allows use of all martial weapons. Other characters can take that Talent with a normal Talent slot, and anyone can take a Talent for proficiency in a specific special weapon.

You have 8 primary attributes; Charisma, Endurance, Intelligence, Nimbleness, Perception, Strength, Tenacity, and Wisdom. You'll start with 480 points to spend on them, but must have a minimum of 1 point in each and no more than 100 points in each. For most purposes, every 10 or 20 points in a primary attribute are beneficial to some secondary attribute or calculation.

Your Strength modifier on melee damage (and ranged weapon damage when appropriate) is based on how much Strength you have above or below 50; higher STR yields a damage bonus, lower STR yields a damage penalty (minimum of 1 damage per hit). Wielding a two-handed weapon doubles your STR damage bonus if positive. Your number of Life Points in each hit location is equal to your character level multiplied by 1/10th of your Endurance (rounded down). These END-based LP are halved for the neck, and doubled for the torso. Spellcasters have Mana Points (MP) equal to their Endurance attribute. Casting a spell costs MP equal to the spell's Difficulty, modified by improvisation. MP recovers over time, and LP can heal naturally as well.

Racial attribute modifiers are applied after assigning points. After that, you get a number of skill points to spend equal to the total of all your primary attributes (490 points at 1st-level since racial attribute modifiers all come out to a total of +10.). Each skill point spent on a path skill gets you a 1% bonus in that skill, while every 2 skill points spent on a non-path skill gets you a 1% bonus in it. No skill can have a percentage more than 10% above the linked attribute (so a STR-based skill cannot go more than 10 points above your Strength). After all of this, you get your 20 bonus Path skill points for 1st-level to spend only on path skills, and this can exceed the attribute-based maximum for each skill. However no skill can go beyond a total percentage of 100% from skill points alone.

Each character gets 2 Talents at each new level. As noted, Warriors get the Talent for martial weapons for free. Merthwargs gain the Animal Ally Talent for free, but anyone can take that Talent with a normal Talent slot. Both of those are Core Talents available to anyone. Each Path has its own Path Talents selectable only when taking levels in that Path. Elite Paths and Master Paths typically allow selection of Talents from their associated Basic Path as well. There are many Core Talents available to anyone who wants to spend a Talent slot on them, but some of them are just weaker versions of Path Talents specific to particular Paths. Some Talents grant extra skill points, while others provide different bonuses, special abilities, or special attacks. There are also a few Core Talents for creating magic items, if the character has the appropriate prerequisites for those items.

I'll give a tiny bit more rules-info later and some much-needed setting info as well, but this covers all of the basics beyond what I already described in the first post.

_________________
Active DM and player on OpenRPG since 2002
D&D, d20, PF, SR, and other systems if I can find a group for 'em


Fri Nov 18, 2011 12:21 am
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Joined: Thu Dec 17, 2009 4:35 am
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Location: Glendale, AZ, USA
Post Re: Anyone for Chronicles of Ramlar?
A few more details, starting with a few more of the rules and then some background:

Momentum benefits only apply for 1 round. Each Momentum benefit costs a certain amount of SV from the previous round, and it costs more SV to extend the benefit to allies (some Momentum benefits, like extra attacks, are self-only). Momentum SV can occasionally be earned with noncombat actions or the like, such as with a clever or daring deed just before engaging the enemy or interrupting the enemy's plans/maneuvers/etc.

Combat turns go in order of the smallest group to the largest group. PCs go first if tied in numbers with a group of NPCs.

Damaged armor/shield AP are lost until repaired with the Armoury skill. Life Points heal naturally each day based on activity level, and treatment with the Healing skill can heal more LP per day. That skill can also be used for a little bit of LP recovery after battle or a single Life Point per round during battle, but it's very distracting to use in battle so it leaves both healer and patient stationary and vulnerable for a round. Divine spells and nature spells can heal LP faster and more often. Some attack spells bypass armor/shields and damage LP directly.

Some time-consuming actions require "dramatic action" rolls, meaning multiple rolls instead of a single one to determine success. Dramatic actions require a certain total Success Value to complete over the course of multiple rolls, based on the difficulty or magnitude of the task. Using the Healing skill in combat is a dramatic action performed over one or more rounds with one or more rolls until achieving the required TSV.

Ranged weaponry normally doesn't get any STR damage bonus unless customized beforehand to allow it (i.e. customized throwing daggers or a customized composite longbow instead of a normal knife or a normal stick-with-a-string bow). Ranged weapons have a Range Increment, incurring a penalty on attack rolls when attacking beyond that RI, with a greater penalty for each additional RI exceeded. Items can be customized by working on them or crafting them with the appropriate skill, or they can be enchanted as magic items with the appropriate Talents, skills, magic, and reagents. Either way it's expensive to customize gear, and there are limits to what mundane customization can do, so it's not something a low-level character can expect to afford.

The last bit of rules-info I think bears mentioning is that the constellation under which a character is born may yield minor benefits on occasion. There are 16 constellations, 12 of which provide a benefit during certain times of the year or times of month. 3 of them provide a constant benefit and are clearly superior as a result. There aren't any rules for determining which one a PC is born under, so I'll just roll randomly for each PC and reroll if the constellation doesn't seem to fit the character's capabilities and focus.

Sidenote: Though many people on Eranon revere Ramlar above all, he is more of a distant god and leaves the governance of the World's affairs to the Alari, whom he created for that purpose. Ramlar grants no Divine Boons and cannot be a divine spellcaster's patron deity; he does not meddle in the affairs of mere mortals, and Magic itself is Ramlar's gift to the World; arcane spells and nature spells simply harness the endless flow of energy Ramlar left in the leylines. Divine spells come directly from an Alari or Eleri, though they still use power from the leylines.

Setting Basics (very rough overview):

The setting's supreme deity is Ramlar, who created the world with the aid of the Alari and Eleri, intermediate and lesser deities. Ramlar created the Alari, who in turn created the Eleri at Ramlar's behest. There are five male Alari and five female Alari, in mated pairs. The smallest and weakest Alari, Gabrun, strove to outdo his siblings when Ramlar enlisted their aid in creating all that would inhabit the World. Gabrun stole power and ideas from his siblings as they helped Ramlar refine and populate the World he had created. Gabrun sapped his wife Pilith's willpower at the same time, then convinced her to assist him and keep his secret. Gabrun created many races to compete with and outdo those his siblings had made, and he used the stolen power to create more Eleri than what Ramlar had permitted.

Everything was peaceful for awhile as the gods worked with their mortal creations, until Ramlar revealed Gabrun's treachery and the evil that had grown within Gabrun's heart. He cursed Gabrun, Pilith, their Eleri, and their creations, distorting their perceptions and often their appearances to reflect the evil within them and their deeds. And so the Druegarn, Gabrun's race of Elves made to surpass those originally created by Veda, became dark elves and were spurned by those who had once respected their great works of art, artifice, and spellcraft. Orcs, goblins, giants, and such were twisted and deformed by Ramlar's curse, and like all of Gabrun's and Pilith's creations, began to see good and evil in reverse, loving darkness and that which was evil or ugly as Gabrun and Pilith now did, while hating good, beauty, and light. The gods were given a brief chance to return to the World and meet with their creations one last time before Ramlar forced the Alari and Eleri to return to the Outer Planes beyond the mortal World.

A massive war was later waged by the dark elves and the now-monstrous races created by Gabrun and Pilith, called the Dakass Luot, that ravaged the landscape of Eranon, the continent where most of the World's races live. Eventually the war ended and civilizations began to rebuild, but the Druegarn and other creations of the dark gods remain distrusted and widely hated. Though there are a rare few among the dark elves who manage to find some acceptance among other races, like the Druegarn archmage Istolil Hune who serves the humuan monarchs in Aurod, the greatest human city since Galdarest's destruction in the Dakass Luot.

The World itself is named Ramlar after the supreme deity of the setting. There are 2 major continents and 4 great oceans around them. Eranon is the continent where most of the known races reside, while Isidria is the continent where Elves came from. Many elves migrated to Eranon eventually, in three great clans. The Fetharn are forest-elves, largely inhabiting the Brightwood Forest (capitol city: Seramis) in northeastern Eranon, first to make the migration from Isidria, though some live in other regions. Fetharn are tall, intelligent, graceful, optimistic, and a bit frail. Sinflar are mountain-elves, the second clan to migrate from Isidria, and primarily inhabit the Gerukan Mountains in central Eranon (capitol city Naldaress). Sinflar are tougher and stronger than most other elves, but not as wise, great warriors and artisans, normally pleasant but easily forming grudges. Tylvare are the plains-elves who migrated to the Hilspar Plains in midwestern Eranon, where they live as nomads and have only one permanent structure, the Stones of War erected after arriving on Eranon. Tylvare are slightly shorter than other elves but stronger, though much more primitive and superstitious, and bereft of any Magical ability. Druegarn fled to Eranon after they were cursed by Ramlar, under Gabrun's advisement, and now live in the underground realms called the Dark Sprawl or the World Below. Druegarn are more nimble and perceptive than other elves, but slightly frail, while most are prideful, greedy, and sadistic.

Humans are divided into Auzronians, Frorinians, Osarians, and Nurinians. The Auzronians are the most-varied and widely-settled race, with many different kingdoms across Eranon, but their greatest city is Aurod in central Eranon just north of the Gerukan Mountains. Auzronians are wise and nimble but not as muscular as other humans. The Frorinians live mostly in the frozen northwestern mountain range and tundra called The Chill, particularly the Rutan Mountains. They are taller and stronger than other humans, tougher than most, but somewhat primitive. Osarians dominate the Desert of Osar just west of the Gerukan Mountains and east of the Hilspar Plains, allowing no trespassers. The Osarians are dusky-skinned and dark-haired from living in the sunscorched desert for so many generations (capitol city: Nasir), and they are tougher than other humans, graceful but a bit irrational and paranoid, very secretive. The Nurinians were corrupted by Gabrun through their people's leader, after he lead them to the Black Desert in southeastern Eranon, where they founded their capitol, Nimrolt, called by others the Dark City. Nurinians are tall and slender but not so big as Frorinians, though tougher and more perceptive, albeit less muscular like Auzronians. Nurinians are the only allies of the Druegarn, but also maintain trade with other races.

Dwarves are divided into the Hethmarkn, wise and perceptive but not very strong, and the Kasmarkn, who are tougher, stronger, and iron-willed, but not so friendly. Hethmarkn are 4 to 5 feet tall and slimmer than other dwarves, many traveling abroad to gather lore as their creator Hur commanded. Their lore is stored in a massive underground library/city called simply The Book, hidden somewhere beneath Eranon and existing only in rumor among other races. Kasmarkn are several inches taller than their kin, with more of a penchant for physical pursuits and craftsmanship, though they have the best enchanters in the world at Runespar University in their capitol city of Tronle, among the Elokarn Mountains of eastern Eranon.

Halflings chiefly reside in Arylyn, north of the Elokarn Mountains and south of the Brightwood Forest. They are 3 to 4 feet tall, agile and perceptive but with less strength than other folk, the most carefree and friendly race of Eranon, vivacious but short-lived compared to other races.

Spirinari have their capitol Selani in northwestern Eranon, just south of The Chill, and it is constructed entirely of spirit bone in the Valley of Rings where they built countless rings and arches of spirit bone, supposedly enchanted to ward off evil. Selani is off-limits to other races except for two periods of trade each year, and even then access is restricted for non-Spirinari. The Spirinari themselves are tall, lean, and beautiful folk resembling humans, with hard, angular features and exceedingly long lifespans. They are wise and intelligent, but not as tough as humans. They're very protective of spirit bone and use it to craft many magic items, never allowing other races to own or use these creations, and only rarely giving spirit bone as a gift to others. They do circulate small numbers of spirit bone pieces akin to coins, which other races use as well for large transactions.


Last edited by Arkhandus on Tue Nov 22, 2011 10:22 am, edited 1 time in total.



Fri Nov 18, 2011 5:56 am
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Joined: Thu Dec 17, 2009 4:35 am
Posts: 311
Location: Glendale, AZ, USA
Post Re: Anyone for Chronicles of Ramlar?
I can provide some more information regarding any given character concept, and at this point I think I've provided enough of an overview of the setting and its rules for folks to start discussing character concepts.

I'd also like to know what days and times among those listed in the first post you think you could play.


Fri Nov 18, 2011 9:08 am
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Joined: Fri Dec 18, 2009 6:30 pm
Posts: 127
Post Re: Anyone for Chronicles of Ramlar?
Sorry, I have to drop out of this game.


Fri Nov 18, 2011 9:23 am
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Joined: Thu Dec 17, 2009 4:35 am
Posts: 311
Location: Glendale, AZ, USA
Post Re: Anyone for Chronicles of Ramlar?
Dang........ :(

Well..........is there anyone else interested?


Sat Nov 19, 2011 4:24 am
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Joined: Fri Apr 15, 2011 11:32 pm
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Post Re: Anyone for Chronicles of Ramlar?
divine caster sounds interesting


Sat Nov 19, 2011 4:38 am
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